CFM engines are developed and produced according to a clear and efficient industrial workshare arrangement, in which each partner is fully responsible for the development and production of its part of the engine: GE, the core, and Safran Aircraft Engines, the low-pressure section, accessories and nozzle. Each partner deploys its own development, assembly and test facilities, and assembles half of all engines produced. Safran Aircraft Engines and GE also split responsibility for CFM sales and support worldwide. The CFM partnership covers the development, production and sale of aircraft engines in a thrust range from 18,500 to 50,000 lbf. In 2008, it was renewed through 2040 and extended to include services. Calling on the proven MRO expertise of its parent companies, CFM supports all customers and develops innovative new products and services.

Workshare CFM

More details on CFM International

CFM : Safran Aircraft Engines and GE, a textbook partnership

Safran Aircraft Engines and GE bring together their top technologies and know-how within the 50/50 joint company, CFM International, the world's leading supplier of engines for single-aisle commercial jets, including the best-selling CFM56® and the upcoming LEAP®.

CFM's success is based on core values that are primordial for both operators and aircraft manufacturers: unrivaled reliability, low operating costs, customer relations based on mutual trust, world-class support and upholding promises – over the years CFM has introduced 21 engine models, all on time and to spec! These values, an integral part of CFM's DNA, have guided the design of a brand-new engine to power the upcoming generation of single-aisle jetliners: the LEAP, already chosen by the world's two leading planemakers, Airbus and Boeing, as well as Comac of China. With more than 10,500 LEAP engine orders and commitments, it is already the best-selling engine under development in the history of aviation. The LEAP has been chosen for more than 7 out of 10 new-generation single-aisle jets. Both Safran Aircraft Engines and GE have invested heavily in their production capacity, to meet one of the most daunting industrial challenges since the dawn of aviation. In the space of just two years – 2017-2018 – CFM will have to make an almost complete transition from the CFM56 to the LEAP, while also handling a record ramp-up, from 1,500 engines/year to more than 2,000 in 2020.

  • 20,000
    new aircraft to be delivered
    in the single-aisle commercial jet segment over the next 20 years
  • 3
    millions passengers
    a day travel on CFM56-powered plane
  • 800
    million flight-hours
    logged by the CFM56 fleet